Top Tips To Create A Dog Friendly Garden

Your dog is very much a part of the family, so why shouldn’t your garden be a reflection of that?

I know what you’re thinking, having a dog running in the garden means that you can’t have a beautiful lawn, let alone gorgeous flower beds, rosebushes, Skip Cherry Laurel Shrubs from The Tree Center or anything else! But if you take a little time your garden can be a little haven for your dog as well as the rest of your family no matter the season.

Make your surfaces pet friendly

If you want them to walk on paths instead of through the garden beds then make the pavers comfortable for them. Ensure that garden paths are pea gravel; this will have no sharp edges or stones. It’s also important that the pathway you choose isn’t liable to get too hot in the warm summer months!

Does your dog like patrolling your garden? Protecting you and your family from bumblebees and over grown rose bushes and the occasional squirrel? Laying a path shows your dog (in theory) where you’d like them to stay!

Create comfort zones

Your four-legged friend loves running around in the garden, I’m sure. But as you know, this can result in your dog getting a little hot. make sure there’s a cool shady spot under a tree or an awning where they can lie down and recover from all their running around and patrolling! And of course, don’t forget to put out plenty of bowls of water, preferably in a nice shady spot.

Make a mini dog park

Try to designate a specific area for your pooch to play. Whether it’s fetch or chase games, find a grassy area that’s got enough room for your dog to enjoy himself. Play fetch with a small, harmless object that won’t destroy your prize peonies. Tiny tennis balls good for this purpose (if you have a small dog). If your dog is too big for tiny tennis balls, consider regular size tennis balls, they’re not too destructive!

Plant strong, sturdy plants

Lets face it, there will be wrestling and rough housing; you don’t want your dogs careening into your foxgloves because that will be the end of the foxgloves. Plant sturdy perennial grasses or dense edging plants like boxwood or low, resilient creepers–like, say, thyme–as a buffer zone between the dogs’ play area and fragile flowers.

Fence them in

Erecting a fence means is ideal for your dogs safety and the sanity of your surrounding neighbours! by fencing the garden; they’ll have room to roam and you won’t have to worry they’ll end up in the street or the neighbours gardens!

Toilet trouble

No one wants to pick up poo from their freshly cut grass, so try to encourage your dog to go in a particular area! Dogs will mark their territory. It’s a thing they do, so if you see your dog marking on plants or grass, use a hose to flood the area and dissipate the effects before plants turn brown or wilt.

Disclosure: This is a collaborative post.

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1 Comment

  1. December 14, 2017 / 11:12 am

    Hi Jo, yes, there are so many benefits of a garden in respect of health and the environment both. If we have pets in our home so we should keep in mind theses points. Thanks for guiding us for making nice garden.

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